Bargain Guidebook: Pendennis Castle and St Mawes Castle Stockists
 

Guidebook: Pendennis Castle and St Mawes Castle Stockists

The castles of Pendennis and St Mawes were built by King Henry VIII. They were part of a chain of coastal forts created when Spain and France threatened to invade England in the 16th century. For more than 400 years Pendennis Castle played a vital role in the defence of Cornwall seeing action during the Civil War in the 17th century and then again in the Second World War.On the other side of the Fal estuary elegant St Mawes Castle is the most perfect and ornate survivor of all King Henry VIII’s forts.This beautifully illustrated guidebook provides a full tour and history to both remarkable sites.Key Features:48 pagesPaperbackPublished in 2016

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Guidebook: Carisbrooke Castle

Carisbrooke Castle was the key to the defence of the Isle of Wight for...

Carisbrooke Castle was the key to the defence of the Isle of Wight for more than six centuries this guidebook is beautifully illustrated and written by leading English Heritage experts.Carisbrooke Castle has been the most important stronghold on the Isle of Wight from at least Saxon times. The keep and main walls were built soon after the Norman conquest and the castle was frequently updated over the centuries under the threat of Spanish invasion in Elizabeth I's reign it was transformed into a state-of-the-art artillery fortress. During the Civil War it was used as a prison most famously housing Charles I who twice attempted and failed to escape while he was held here in 1647-8. The castle also served as a magnificent residence for the lords and governors of the Isle of Wight including Princess Beatrice Queen Victoria's youngest daughter who used Carisbrooke as her summer home until 1938....


 
 

Radiocarbon Dates: 2002 - 2004

This volume holds a datelist of 476 radiocarbon determinations carried...

This volume holds a datelist of 476 radiocarbon determinations carried out between 2002 and 2004 in support of research funded by English heritage through the Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund. It contains supporting information about the samples and the sites producing them a comprehensive bibliography and two indexes for reference and analysis. An introduction provides information about the scientific dating undertaken and methods used for the analyses reported. Details of technical reports available for programmes of luminescence dating and amino-acid racemization funded under this scheme are also provided. The datelist has been collated from information provided by the submitters of samples and the dating laboratories in order to provide easy access to raw scientific and contextual data which may be used in further research. Many of the sites and projects from which dates have been obtained are...


 
 

The Rows of Chester

Almost ten years of historical and archaeological research on the Rows...

Almost ten years of historical and archaeological research on the Rows of Chester the most extensive surviving example in Europe of a medieval two-tier complex of shops are detailed in this thorough and authoritative report. The Rows of Chester form a unique system of walkways through the frontages of buildings on the city's four main streets. They pass above the street-level shops giving access to a second tier of shops at Row (first floor) level. Established in 1984 the Chester Rows Research Project aimed to survey all the Rows buildings using an interdisciplinary approach in which an appreciation of the architectural and social influences that gave rise to the two-tier system were combined with archaeolgoical investigation and historical reeach. The ultimate aim was to understand the origins of the Rows and the reasons for their survival. There is no evidence for an imposed planning scheme at...


 
 

St Pauls Cathedral Before Wren

St Paul’s Cathedral is the City of London’s most important...

St Paul’s Cathedral is the City of London’s most important monument and historic building. But Wren’s great work is only the most recent of a succession of Anglo-Saxon and medieval cathedrals on the site where Christianity was first established in AD 604.This report is the first ever comprehensive account of the archaeology and history of the cathedral and its churchyard from Roman times up to the construction of the Wren building which began in 1675. Archaeological excavations and observations go back to the time of Wren. The Anglo-Saxon cathedral is an enigma and even its precise site somewhere in the churchyard is not known for certain. The medieval cathedral was probably the largest building in medieval Britain and one of the largest in Europe with its 400ft-spire and a rose window to rival those we now see at Notre Dame in Paris. Recent excavations in and around the Wren building...


 
 

Guidebook: Wrest Park

Wrest Park is an exceptional rarity. Its grounds contain one of the few...

Wrest Park is an exceptional rarity. Its grounds contain one of the few remaining formal gardens of the early 18th century and the house is a near unique example of English architecture following the style of 18th century French chateau.For over 600 years the estate was home to one of the leading aristocratic families in the country the de Greys. They rose to prominence under Edward IV who made Edmund Grey 1st Earl of Kent.More than 200 years later the formal gardens and Long Water were created by Amabel Benn together with her son Anthony the 11th earl and his wife Mary. Anthony’s son the Duke of Kent laid out what is now Wrest’s most exceptional feature its formal woodland garden employing leading garden designers to create an ordered landscape of woodland avenues ornamented with statuary and garden buildings.The duke’s granddaughter Jemima brought in ‘Capability’ Brown...


 
 

Berwick-upon-Tweed

Nikolaus Pevsner described Berwick-upon-Tweed as one of the most exciting...

Nikolaus Pevsner described Berwick-upon-Tweed as one of the most exciting towns in England a place where an absorbing historical tale can still be read in the dense fabric of its old streets and buildings. It attracts not only day-trippers and holidaymakers but also new residents who have learnt to appreciate the spirit of the place. But outsiders all too easily confine their attention to the space within the impressive Elizabethan ramparts while local people are sometimes unaware or dismissive of the wider significance of the very things that they know so intimately. Berwick deserves to be known better and to be celebrated not just as a vivid reminder of what many other towns were once like but more especially as something unique and distinctive shaped by a peculiar combination of historical and geographical circumstances. This distinctiveness is acutely apparent as one passes between Berwick and...


 
 

Alston Moor, Cumbria

Raises awareness of the wide range and varied character of the historic...

Raises awareness of the wide range and varied character of the historic landscape and buildings of Alston Moor - Highlights the bastle - a rare and unique northern upland building - Part of the critically acclaimed Informed Conservation series. Alston Moor is a large rural parish in Cumbria which historically both depended upon and provided important services for the agricultural and mineral industries of the North Pennines. Much of the area's settlement is dispersed among hamlets and single farmsteads. Isolated from major northern cities such as Carlisle and Newcastle by the surrounding hills and moors the parish's wild upland landscape provides a conditioning influence on a distinctive tradition of vernacular building types ranging from the bastle to its later 18th- and 19th-century derivatives and 'mine shops' providing lodgings for miners close to their place of work. Found...


 
 

Religion and Place in Leeds

Religious and cultural diversity has been a key feature of the city of...

Religious and cultural diversity has been a key feature of the city of Leeds for almost 200 years and has resulted in the building of many fine churches chapels and synagogues; these are now joined by mosques gurdwaras and a mandir.Tracing the architectural response to the changing conditions of the inner city and suburbs this book examines the buildings associated with the groups of newcomers to Leeds thus charting a great change in the city's religious life. It is suggested that both the brand-new purpose-built places of worship and the way in which existing buildings have been adapted also reveal significant continuities with how Christian groups expanded in the 19th century. The alterations made to Leeds - churches to adapt them to changing liturgical requirements and to the pastoral and social requirements of the present day are discussed.The context of the architectural expression of faith...


 
 

Guidebook: Brodsworth Hall and Gardens

Brodsworth Hall is an outstanding example of a Victorian country house....

Brodsworth Hall is an outstanding example of a Victorian country house. Built and furnished between 1861 and 1863 by Charles Sabine Augustus Thellusson the house has survived with most of its original contents and was given to English Heritage in 1990.Since then it has undergone a comprehensive conservation programme before opening to the public for the first time in 1995. This souvenir guide contains a full tour of the house from the opulent interiors of the family rooms to the solidly practical servants' wing together with the delightful gardens. It includes a history of the Thellusson and Grant-Dalton families illustrated by numerous photographs from the family albums.Key Features:48 pagesPaperbackPublished in 2014


 
 

Guidebook: Apsley House

Apsley House was once the home of the 1st Duke of Wellington. The house...

Apsley House was once the home of the 1st Duke of Wellington. The house has been a national shrine to the victor of Waterloo almost from the day the duke bought it in 1817 two years after the battle.The original house was built by Robert Adam between 1771 and 1778 for Henry Bathurst 1st Baron Apsley. In 1807 he sold the house to Marquess Wellesley older brother of Wellington. In 1817 Wellington bought the lease and employed Benjamin Dean Wyatt to enlarge and remodel the house. Although Wyatt’s alterations were extensive parts of Adam’s design and decoration are still visible today.Over the next 35 years the duke filled his London home with trophies paintings and portraits illustrating his achievements. Many of Wellington’s own visitors felt that his house looked more like a museum than a home. The collection comprises nearly 3000 paintings sculptures and works of art including works...


 
 

St Mary’s Church, Studley Royal

St Mary's Church is William Burges’s ecclesiastical masterpiece....

St Mary's Church is William Burges’s ecclesiastical masterpiece. It was built in the 1870s for the Marquis and Marchioness for Ripon. Its towering spire rises like that of a small cathedral on the Studley Royal estate. The church now only in occasional liturgical use is a memorial to William Burges’s devotion to Early English architecture and his artistic love of imagery. It is preserved in the guardianship of English Heritage and is managed by the National Trust.


 
 

Guidebook: Dover Castle, French Translation

Dover Castle's location commanding the shortest sea crossing between...

Dover Castle's location commanding the shortest sea crossing between England and the Continent has given it immense strategic importance. The chalk of Castle Hill has been shaped and reshaped over the centuries into massive earthworks ditches and mounds. Imposing walls and towers have been raised and networks of tunnels built beneath them. Henry II began the building of the present castle in the 1180s and over the next 800 years its building and defences were adapted to meet the changing demands of weapons and warfare.This guidebook packed with historic images reconstructions and plans provides a full tour of this iconic castle and relates its long and eventful history.


 
 

Guidebook: Landguard Fort

Standing at the mouth of the Rivers Orwell and Stour Landguard Fort is...

Standing at the mouth of the Rivers Orwell and Stour Landguard Fort is an impressive monument to the long history of coastal defence in the British Isles. This guidebook provides a tour and a history of the fort richly illustrated with new and historic photographs plans and maps.Key Features:36 pagesPaperbackPublished in 2006


 
 

Guidebook: Stonehenge. Japanese

Today visitors experience Stonehenge as a wonder of ancient achievement...

Today visitors experience Stonehenge as a wonder of ancient achievement and an enduring symbol of mystery. But Stonehenge was built as a temple - a place of ceremony of burial and of celebration. The first Stonehenge was simple - just a circular ditch and bank perhaps with a few small upright timber posts or stones - and was constructed about 5000 years ago in the period of prehistory known as the Neolithic or New Stone Age.By about 2500 BC more and much larger stones had been brought to the site huge sarsen stones from north Wiltshire and smaller bluestones from west Wales. This marked the beginning of over 800 years of construction and alteration stretching into the period known as the Bronze Age when the first metal tools and weapons were made. By this time Stonehenge was the greatest temple in Britain its banks ditches and standing stones arranged in sophisticated alignments to mark the passage...


 
 

Defending Scilly

The Isles of Scilly are renowned for their natural beauty wild flowers...

The Isles of Scilly are renowned for their natural beauty wild flowers and temperate climate but there is another reason to visit these paradise islands. Since the 16th century they have been in the frontline of this country's military defences and successive generations of fortifications have survived in Scilly unmatched in any other location around Britain.This unrivalled survival was due to the lack of pressure to develop the islands and happily because the feared enemy rarely attacked. However there is another threat to this precious heritage the power of the sea. William Borlase in the mid-18th century recorded how much of the islands' history had succumbed to rising sea level and today increasingly turbulent weather patterns may be accelerating the process of coastal erosion.This book celebrates the unique survival of military fortifications on the islands but it also serves to illustrate...





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