Bargain Hambledon Hill, Dorset, England Stockists
 

Hambledon Hill, Dorset, England Stockists

A programme of excavation and survey directed by Roger Mercer between 1974 and 1986 demonstrated that Hambledon was the site of an exceptionally large and diverse complex of earlier Neolithic earthworks including two causewayed enclosures two long barrows and several outworks some of them defensive. The abundant cultural material preserved in its ditches and pits provides information about numerous aspects of contemporary society among them conflict feasting the treatment of the human corpse exchange stock management and cereal cultivation. The distinct depositional signatures of various parts of the complex reflect their diverse use.A programme of excavation and survey directed by Roger Mercer between 1974 and 1986 demonstrated that Hambledon was the site of an exceptionally large and diverse complex of earlier Neolithic earthworks including two causewayed enclosures two long barrows and several outworks some of them defensive. The abundant cultural material preserved in its ditches and pits provides information about numerous aspects of contemporary society among them conflict feasting the treatment of the human corpse exchange stock management and cereal cultivation. The distinct depositional signatures of various parts of the complex reflect their diverse use. The scale and manner of individual episodes of construction hint at the levels of organisation and co-ordination obtaining in contemporary society.Use of the complex and the construction of its various elements were episodic and intermittent spread over 300-400 hundred years and did not entail lasting settlement. As well as stone axe heads exchanged from remote sources more abundant grinding equipment and pottery from adjacent regions may point to the areas from which people came to the hill. If so it had important links with territories to the west north-west and south in other words with land off the Wessex Chalk at the edge of which the complex lies. Within the smaller compass of the immediate area of the hill including Cranborne Chase field walking survey suggests that the hill was the main focus of earlier Neolithic activity.A complementary relationship with the Chase is indicated by a fairly abrupt diminution of activity on the hill in the late fourth millennium when the massive Dorset cursus and several smaller monuments were built in the Chase. Renewed activity on the hill in the late third millennium and early second millennium was a prelude to occupation on and around the hill in the second millennium in the mid to late second millennium which was followed by the construction of a hillfort on the northern spur from the early first millennium. Late Iron Age and Romano-British activity may reflect the proximity of Hod Hill. A small pagan Saxon cemetery may relate to settlement in the Iwerne valley which it overlooks.Key Features:411 pagesPaperbackPublished in 2008

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Chamberlin, Powell & Bon

Chamberlin Powell and Bon are the architects behind London's epic Barbican...

Chamberlin Powell and Bon are the architects behind London's epic Barbican development - this is the first published study of their work. The book contains stunning photography plans and previously unseen archival material.The Barbican is one of London's landmarks and Britain's largest listed building yet its architects Chamberlin Powell and Bon (CPB) are little known today. Their leader Peter (Joe) Chamberlin died young and little of their archive survives. But detective work has revealed a complex story about three determined characters and a surprising variety of fascinating architecture.Chamberlin worked on the Festival of Britain but the practice was formed only in 1952 when Geoffry Powell won a housing competition in London. The resulting Golden Lane Estate is as light and brightly-coloured as the adjoining Barbican that followed is monumental. In between the firm produced a...


 
 

Englands Shipwreck Heritage

What do characters as diverse as Alfred the Great the architect Sir Christopher...

What do characters as diverse as Alfred the Great the architect Sir Christopher Wren diarist Samuel Pepys and the Victorian poet Gerard Manley Hopkins have in common? All had some involvement in shipwrecks: in causing recording or salvaging them. This book examines a variety of wrecks from logboats Roman galleys and medieval cogs to East Indiamen grand ocean liners fishing boats and warships - all are woven into the history of shipwrecks along the coastline of England and in her territorial waters.Wrecks are not just physically embedded in this marine landscape - they are also an intrinsic part of a domestic cultural landscape with links that go beyond the navy mercantile marine and fishing trade. Evidence of shipwrecks is widespread: in literature in domestic architecture and as a major component of industrial archaeology. Shipwrecks also transcend national boundaries forming tangible monuments to...


 
 

Swindon: The Legacy of a Railway Town

'In the pioneering days of early Victorian railway engineering the...

'In the pioneering days of early Victorian railway engineering the decision of Gooch and Brunel to locate an engine house and works just to the north of Swindon led to the creation of a sizeable engineering enterprise and a new settlement.The Great Western Railway became by far the largest employer in the region and for more than a century the fortunes of the town were inseparably linked with the development of the railway.In 1984 however many of the works buildings were under threat due to rationalisation within British Rail Engineering Ltd. Consequently many of the buildings were listed and a photographic record was begun. The quality of the buildings and their significance for railway history were such that a more detailed study was justified. The recording exercise was therefore expanded and this remarkable book is the result of that project.By looking at the buildings themselves it traces...


 
 

Guidebook: Hardwick Old Hall

Hardwick Old Hall is one of the most innovative houses of the Tudor period....

Hardwick Old Hall is one of the most innovative houses of the Tudor period. It was built between 1587 and 1596 by Bess of Hardwick a friend of Elizabeth I and one of the richest women of the Elizabethan age. At the same time Bess built the neighbouring New Hall to complement the Old Hall and to provide extra accommodation. Furnished with the finest pieces and textiles Hardwick would once have been a glittering reflection of Bess's status and aspirations. This brand new guide contains a family tree plans maps and a wealth of photographs of this charming and evocative house.Key Features:36 pagesPaperbackPublished in 2013


 
 

Guidebook: Farleigh Hungerford Castle

Farleigh Hungerford Castle was built in the late 14th century by Sir Thomas...

Farleigh Hungerford Castle was built in the late 14th century by Sir Thomas Hungerford and was the home of the Hungerford family for more than 300 years. Although ruined it retains impressive corner towers a gatehouse and a chapel with remarkable wall-paintings and tombs. Illustrated with photographs plans and historic images this guidebook presents a tour of the site and a fascinating history of the castle and its owners.Key Features:32 pagesPaperbackPublished in 2014





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